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Headline: April.14.2008Riots, Instability Spread as Food Prices SkyrocketImpoverished peoples around the world have taken to the streets protesting rapidly rising food prices and runs on staple commodities like rice are causing shortages even in developed countries.  The reasons for the crisis include high fuel prices and demand on food crops like corn for ethanol fuel production.

As the following video explains, government subsidies for ethanol production have exasperated the situation, raising feed costs and prices for all meat, dairy and egg products, in addition to cereal grains and other foods.Biofuel Backlash

Ironically, corn is actually a poor choice for ethanol production and has other consequences for the environment. Sugar-rich plants like Sugar Beets and Cane yield more fuel than starchy corn, while corn makes high demands on the water and land.  Many experts now believe that ethanol should be made from cellulose, especially in climates where sugary plants do not grow. And what plant did the U.S. Department of Agriculture recommend as a superior choice for long-term cellulose production? Decades ago, the government knew that Cannabis Hemp yielded four times more cellulose than pine trees over twenty years.

Craig Lee, from the Kentucky Hemp Museum and Library, explains how hemp hurds could provide stock for Cellulosic Ethanol production, as well as highly nutritious Hempseed food and oil products that would actually supplement food supplies and provide economic stability in his native Kentucky – where his family had grown hemp for generations.Hemp for Cellulosic Ethanol

In America, President Bush has called for increased production of Ethanol, despite it’s economic fallout and damage to the land, bowing to the large agribusiness corporations that benefit enormously from the rising demand and profits from corn, supplemented by taxpayer funds. Yet, under his administration, the DEA has refused to issue permits for farmers in North Dakota wanting to grow industrial hemp, like their neighbors to the north in Canada.

In this video, courtesy of Vote Hemp, the North Dakota Commissioner of Agriculture explains why his state could benefit from returning Cannabis Hemp to it’s traditional place in the crop rotation.North Dakota’s Agriculutre Commissioner Backs Hemp

In addition to cellulose from the pith of the stalk (hurds), Cannabis Hemp provides another source of fuel – biodiesel from hemp seed oil! The following video of the “Hemp Car” at the at an Ohio County Fair shows how micro-biodiesel facilities can utilize hemp seed oil.Hempseed Biodiesel Car at Ohio County Fair

“Make the most you can of the Indian Hemp seed and sow it everywhere.” -President George Washington, 1794

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4 Comments

  1. Solid information=D I will definitely come back again soon.

    • cornell
    • Posted September 15, 2010 at 10:37 am
    • Permalink

    hi to whom this may concern i am looking for industrial hemp seed strains possessing a high oil content suitable for cultivation in the Caribbean FINOLA is according to what i can ascertain from the myriad of information on the web seems to be the product of choice for growers but it was never developed with the tropics in mind can you recommend any others
    can any one help me

    Thank you

  2. Wow!!That’s what I’ve benn looking for for a long time~!!
    Thanks for sharing this post~~.

    • Anonymous
    • Posted March 2, 2013 at 7:27 am
    • Permalink

    Wow legalize it for our future


3 Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. […] BBC NEWS | News Front Page wrote an interesting post today on Ethanol from Corn = Disaster; Cellulosic Ethanol from Hemp = StabilityHere’s a quick excerpt Headline: April.14.2008 – Riots, Instability Spread as Food Prices Skyrocket – Impoverished peoples around the world have taken to the streets protesting rapidly rising food prices and runs on staple commodities like rice are causing shortages even in developed countries.  The reasons for the crisis include high fuel prices and demand on food crops like corn for ethanol fuel production. As the following video explains, government subsidies for ethanol production have exasperated the situation […]

  2. […] or pesticide applications and needs far less water than corn, eco-friendly industries like Cellulosic Ethanol (see April.24th post) and products ranging from food to car parts become feasible, given the prolific production of this […]

  3. […] is no secret that you support ethanol, so why not support Hemp, which is a much better source for ethanol than corn? What about the “green jobs” you keep talking about? Isn’t […]

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